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Monday, February 27

  1. page Skadi edited ... Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to…
    ...
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...
    Return to Norse-Viking PantheonReturn to MythopediaGo to Mythopedia Facebook Page
    In the northern lands of Scandinavia, cold, ice and snow are common things to behold, especially in the lengthened winter season. All things that made the ancient Norse some of the most intense, hardened and hearty people to ever live, things that shaped them into the explorers, raiders and traders they would become. Naturally, the Norse had a cold-chillin’ deity to represent and personify the winter and all of the activities one might do within it! In Norse mythology, SKADI is a jötunn (giantess) and considered a goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, wolves, winter, and the mountains. Her name is either identical with the Old Norse common noun "skaði," or “harm,” or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word "skadus" and the Old English "sceadu," both of which mean “shadow.” Either way, it fits the whole vibe of winter, which Skadi was the mistress of. She was a icy-cold girl and as such, her name also may even have been the root-name of the modern day region of Scandinavia!
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...

    (view changes)
    7:08 am
  2. page Skadi edited ... Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, a…
    ...
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...
    ...
    to Norse-Viking Pantheon
    Return
    PantheonReturn to Mythopedia
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    MythopediaGo to Mythopedia
    In the northern lands of Scandinavia, cold, ice and snow are common things to behold, especially in the lengthened winter season. All things that made the ancient Norse some of the most intense, hardened and hearty people to ever live, things that shaped them into the explorers, raiders and traders they would become. Naturally, the Norse had a cold-chillin’ deity to represent and personify the winter and all of the activities one might do within it! In Norse mythology, SKADI is a jötunn (giantess) and considered a goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, wolves, winter, and the mountains. Her name is either identical with the Old Norse common noun "skaði," or “harm,” or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word "skadus" and the Old English "sceadu," both of which mean “shadow.” Either way, it fits the whole vibe of winter, which Skadi was the mistress of. She was a icy-cold girl and as such, her name also may even have been the root-name of the modern day region of Scandinavia!
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    (view changes)
    7:08 am
  3. page Skadi edited ... Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, a…
    ...
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...
    Return to Norse-Viking Pantheon
    Return to Mythopedia
    Go to Mythopedia Facebook Page

    In the northern lands of Scandinavia, cold, ice and snow are common things to behold, especially in the lengthened winter season. All things that made the ancient Norse some of the most intense, hardened and hearty people to ever live, things that shaped them into the explorers, raiders and traders they would become. Naturally, the Norse had a cold-chillin’ deity to represent and personify the winter and all of the activities one might do within it! In Norse mythology, SKADI is a jötunn (giantess) and considered a goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, wolves, winter, and the mountains. Her name is either identical with the Old Norse common noun "skaði," or “harm,” or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word "skadus" and the Old English "sceadu," both of which mean “shadow.” Either way, it fits the whole vibe of winter, which Skadi was the mistress of. She was a icy-cold girl and as such, her name also may even have been the root-name of the modern day region of Scandinavia!
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    (view changes)
    7:07 am
  4. page Skadi edited ... Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, a…
    ...
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...
    In the northern lands of Scandinavia, cold, ice and snow are common things to behold, especially in the lengthened winter season. All things that made the ancient Norse some of the most intense, hardened and hearty people to ever live, things that shaped them into the explorers, raiders and traders they would become. Naturally, the Norse had a cold-chillin’ deity to represent and personify the winter and all of the activities one might do within it! In Norse mythology, SKADI is a jötunn (giantess) and considered a goddess associated with bowhunting, skiing, wolves, winter, and the mountains. Her name is either identical with the Old Norse common noun "skaði," or “harm,” or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word "skadus" and the Old English "sceadu," both of which mean “shadow.” Either way, it fits the whole vibe of winter, which Skadi was the mistress of. She was a icy-cold girl and as such, her name also may even have been the root-name of the modern day region of Scandinavia!
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains of the peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to the sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her the "Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was not a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi couldn’t stand the light and noise of Njord’s home by the seashore. That being the case, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki when she arranged to have a venomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he was bound by the gods within a cave in Helheim, the dreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his murdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the winter goddess, as venom dripped from the snake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki to heal, but when the bowl was full, Sigyn had to go and empty it, and during that time the snake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so that all earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her handiwork, but without a doubt, her punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to the end of the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...

    (view changes)
    7:02 am
  5. page Skadi edited Skadi {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRmJubbebvbUOLusNqRMrrTv295gztZKDG6Vhi…
    Skadi {https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRmJubbebvbUOLusNqRMrrTv295gztZKDG6VhidXvCO_d4h0LQp3w} Skadi isSKADI
    Story by Brandon L. Parsons (2017)
    In
    the goddessnorthern lands of winterScandinavia, cold, ice and hunting. Bow and arrowssnow are one of her weapons.About:
    Skadi is
    common things to behold, especially in the lengthened winter season. All things that made the ancient Norse goddesssome of huntingthe most intense, hardened and winter. She was once marriedhearty people to ever live, things that shaped them into the god Njord, but the marriage didn't last long. She couldn't stand the lightexplorers, raiders and traders they would become. Naturally, the noise of her husband's homeNorse had a cold-chillin’ deity to represent and he didn't likepersonify the coldwinter and drearinessall of her home. Skadi's name means damage or shade. Nothe activities one knows what she looks like for sure. Everyone has there own opinion. On one side they say shemight do within it! In Norse mythology, SKADI is talla jötunn (giantess) and slimconsidered a goddess associated with intensely blue eyesbowhunting, skiing, wolves, winter, and pale skin. On the other they say short and fatmountains. Her name is either identical with dark eyes, long wavy black and,the Old Norse common noun "skaði," or “harm,” or comes from another Germanic root preserved in the Gothic word "skadus" and still keeping the pale white skin because she isOld English "sceadu," both of which mean “shadow.” Either way, it fits the winter goddess. The objects that are hers includewhole vibe of winter, which Skadi was the snowshoes andmistress of. She was a bowicy-cold girl and arrow. She really doesn't have a special power. Sheas such, her name also doesn'tmay even have an origin story just a bunchbeen the root-name of little myths she is involved in.
    Legend:After her fathers death she went out to Asgard to seek revenge. But when she got there instead
    the modern day region of fighting they offered her two things. They offered her a husbandScandinavia!
    Skadi dwells in the highest, coldest mountains
    of her choicethe peninsula, where the snow never melts, and survives the long wintertime as an avid huntress. She was, for a time, married to make her laughthe sea god, Njord; this was a somewhat unwanted marriage, a "gift" given by the Aesir gods because they had killed Skadi's father, Pjazi (Odin Allfather even called her heart was broken from losing her father. She picked her husband but the only thing she saw"Shining Bride of the Gods."). Sadly, it was there feet. Sonot a match made in Asgard; their marriage was a failure because Njord couldn’t stand the cold (the sea, it is supposed, wasn’t a big fan of being frozen!) and dreariness of the mountains, and Skadi went forcouldn’t stand the most elegant pairlight and noise of feet thinking they would belong toNjord’s home by the god Balder but instead they belonged to Njord. Now forseashore. That being the laughingcase, the two amicably parted ways with no known hatred or animosity towards each other.
    Skadi played a major
    part in the final downfall of the trickster god Loki performedwhen she arranged to have a comedic act wherevenomous snake drip poison down upon his face while he tied rope aroundwas bound by the gods within a goats neck and tiedcave in Helheim, the same rope arounddreary Norse underworld (to make matters even worse, the Aesir gods had bound Loki with the innards of his testicles. He then goadedmurdered son, Nari!) An ingenious (if vicious) idea by the goat to run causing pain for bothwinter goddess, as venom dripped from the goatsnake, eating away at his skin, one agonizing drop at a time. Loki's wife Sigyn sat and him.held a bowl beneath the serpent, catching the venom and allowing Loki then fell at Skadi's knees causing even more damage to him. The goddess laughed at this. Even afterheal, but when the two things they saidbowl was done Odin did an extra thing. Odinfull, Sigyn had taken Skadi's fathers eyesto go and threw them up inempty it, and during that time the night skysnake's acidic venom fell back onto Loki's face, causing him to writhe in a tremendous fury, so much so he could live forever. Now that she hadall earthquakes stemmed from pained contortions. No word on whether or not Skadi stuck around to admire her dad's eyes as stars forever,handiwork, but without a doubt, her promised husband,punishments certainly pushed Loki over the edge and her promised laugh everything was done.
    Family: Her father was Thjiazi a giant. She later became married
    into revenge mode...which eventually would lead to Njord who had Freya and Freyr.
    {http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs25/i/2008/175/0/5/Skadi_and_the_wolves_by_TifaMephisto.jpg} Many people have different versions
    the end of what she looks like. Here is one of them.the world, Ragnarok, the Norse apocalypse...
    (view changes)
    7:01 am
  6. page Potamoi edited ... The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd…
    ...
    The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd for a river god, but hey...it’s mythology!), second, as a bull-horned man with the tail of a slithery, serpentine fish instead of legs, and third, as a relaxing man whose arm rests on a pouring pitcher of clear, fresh water (and THAT makes a whole lot more sense!)
    There were a few fairly famous Potamoi throughout Greek mythology, including Achelous (whose river was named for him; the largest river in Greece, and who was defeated in a wrestling match by non other than Herakles himself, all over the right to marry Achelous’ daughter, Deianira!), Alpheus (who fell head over heels for a nymph named Arethusa. She didn’t return the favor and was turned into a spring by Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, who sought to protect the young nymph…), and Scamander, who fought on the side of the Trojans during the Trojan War. Scamander was pretty ticked off when the Greek hero Achilles dumped a ton of Trojan corpses into the waters of his river, polluting it. Out of revenge, the river god viciously overflowed his banks, nearly drowning out Achilles…
    ...
    Return to Mythopedia
    Go
    MythopediaGo to Mythopedia
    (view changes)
    6:16 am
  7. page Potamoi edited ... The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd…
    ...
    The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd for a river god, but hey...it’s mythology!), second, as a bull-horned man with the tail of a slithery, serpentine fish instead of legs, and third, as a relaxing man whose arm rests on a pouring pitcher of clear, fresh water (and THAT makes a whole lot more sense!)
    There were a few fairly famous Potamoi throughout Greek mythology, including Achelous (whose river was named for him; the largest river in Greece, and who was defeated in a wrestling match by non other than Herakles himself, all over the right to marry Achelous’ daughter, Deianira!), Alpheus (who fell head over heels for a nymph named Arethusa. She didn’t return the favor and was turned into a spring by Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, who sought to protect the young nymph…), and Scamander, who fought on the side of the Trojans during the Trojan War. Scamander was pretty ticked off when the Greek hero Achilles dumped a ton of Trojan corpses into the waters of his river, polluting it. Out of revenge, the river god viciously overflowed his banks, nearly drowning out Achilles…
    Return to Greek Pantheon Return to Mythopedia
    Go to Mythopedia Facebook Page

    (view changes)
    6:16 am
  8. page Potamoi edited POTAMOI Story by Brandon L. Parsons (2017) If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they ha…
    POTAMOI
    Story by Brandon L. Parsons (2017)
    If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they have a walloping huge mythological cast of characters around that they created to explain just about everything unexplainable in their world. Every natural process had a daemon (spirit), creature, god or goddess to handle the everyday processes that made the world work, from the big stuff (the sun and weather) to the little things (think flowers). And while certain things were handled by the “heavies” of Greek mythology, such as Poseidon, the god of the seas, handling…well, the seas, even he couldn’t be everywhere at once to handle everything wet in the world! He needed a little assistance on that front, especially in places that were far off from his watery domain. Take for instance the rivers. Small and insignificant in the eyes of Poseidon, and so that’s where there was a B-list string of minor gods that handled all of the rivers of the world called the POTAMOI.
    The Potamoi were the deities who handled and took care of various rivers and streams all across the planet (or at least as far as the Greeks knew about!). Minor characters in the grand scheme of things, sure, but all in all, rivers are pretty dang important when it comes to human survival, so some definite credit is due! Kids of the mighty and ancient Titan (a god “before” the gods) Oceanus, or the salty “world-encircling ocean,” and Tethys, the Titaness of fresh waters, the Potamoi were also brothers to the Oceanids, the goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and later on had daughters who were the Naiades, nymphs of the springs and mountains. These guys did a lot of moving and shaking, even if they weren’t main cast members of the Olympian story!
    The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd for a river god, but hey...it’s mythology!), second, as a bull-horned man with the tail of a slithery, serpentine fish instead of legs, and third, as a relaxing man whose arm rests on a pouring pitcher of clear, fresh water (and THAT makes a whole lot more sense!)
    There were a few fairly famous Potamoi throughout Greek mythology, including Achelous (whose river was named for him; the largest river in Greece, and who was defeated in a wrestling match by non other than Herakles himself, all over the right to marry Achelous’ daughter, Deianira!), Alpheus (who fell head over heels for a nymph named Arethusa. She didn’t return the favor and was turned into a spring by Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, who sought to protect the young nymph…), and Scamander, who fought on the side of the Trojans during the Trojan War. Scamander was pretty ticked off when the Greek hero Achilles dumped a ton of Trojan corpses into the waters of his river, polluting it. Out of revenge, the river god viciously overflowed his banks, nearly drowning out Achilles…

    If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they have a walloping huge mythological cast of characters around that they created to explain just about everything unexplainable in their world. Every natural process had a daemon (spirit), creature, god or goddess to handle the everyday processes that made the world work, from the big stuff (the sun and weather) to the little things (think flowers). And while certain things were handled by the “heavies” of Greek mythology, such as Poseidon, the god of the seas, handling…well, the seas, even he couldn’t be everywhere at once to handle everything wet in the world! He needed a little assistance on that front, especially in places that were far off from his watery domain. Take for instance the rivers. Small and insignificant in the eyes of Poseidon, and so that’s where there was a B-list string of minor gods that handled all of the rivers of the world called the POTAMOI.
    The Potamoi were the deities who handled and took care of various rivers and streams all across the planet (or at least as far as the Greeks knew about!). Minor characters in the grand scheme of things, sure, but all in all, rivers are pretty dang important when it comes to human survival, so some definite credit is due! Kids of the mighty and ancient Titan (a god “before” the gods) Oceanus, or the salty “world-encircling ocean,” and Tethys, the Titaness of fresh waters, the Potamoi were also brothers to the Oceanids, the goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and later on had daughters who were the Naiades, nymphs of the springs and mountains. These guys did a lot of moving and shaking, even if they weren’t main cast members of the Olympian story!
    (view changes)
    6:14 am
  9. page Potamoi edited POTAMOI Story by Brandon L. Parsons (2017) If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they ha…
    POTAMOI
    Story by Brandon L. Parsons (2017)
    If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they have a walloping huge mythological cast of characters around that they created to explain just about everything unexplainable in their world. Every natural process had a daemon (spirit), creature, god or goddess to handle the everyday processes that made the world work, from the big stuff (the sun and weather) to the little things (think flowers). And while certain things were handled by the “heavies” of Greek mythology, such as Poseidon, the god of the seas, handling…well, the seas, even he couldn’t be everywhere at once to handle everything wet in the world! He needed a little assistance on that front, especially in places that were far off from his watery domain. Take for instance the rivers. Small and insignificant in the eyes of Poseidon, and so that’s where there was a B-list string of minor gods that handled all of the rivers of the world called the POTAMOI.
    The Potamoi were the deities who handled and took care of various rivers and streams all across the planet (or at least as far as the Greeks knew about!). Minor characters in the grand scheme of things, sure, but all in all, rivers are pretty dang important when it comes to human survival, so some definite credit is due! Kids of the mighty and ancient Titan (a god “before” the gods) Oceanus, or the salty “world-encircling ocean,” and Tethys, the Titaness of fresh waters, the Potamoi were also brothers to the Oceanids, the goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and later on had daughters who were the Naiades, nymphs of the springs and mountains. These guys did a lot of moving and shaking, even if they weren’t main cast members of the Olympian story!
    The Potamoi usually were depicted in several forms; one, as a man-headed bull (which seems odd for a river god, but hey...it’s mythology!), second, as a bull-horned man with the tail of a slithery, serpentine fish instead of legs, and third, as a relaxing man whose arm rests on a pouring pitcher of clear, fresh water (and THAT makes a whole lot more sense!)
    There were a few fairly famous Potamoi throughout Greek mythology, including Achelous (whose river was named for him; the largest river in Greece, and who was defeated in a wrestling match by non other than Herakles himself, all over the right to marry Achelous’ daughter, Deianira!), Alpheus (who fell head over heels for a nymph named Arethusa. She didn’t return the favor and was turned into a spring by Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, who sought to protect the young nymph…), and Scamander, who fought on the side of the Trojans during the Trojan War. Scamander was pretty ticked off when the Greek hero Achilles dumped a ton of Trojan corpses into the waters of his river, polluting it. Out of revenge, the river god viciously overflowed his banks, nearly drowning out Achilles…

    If you know the ancient Greeks, you know that they have a walloping huge mythological cast of characters around that they created to explain just about everything unexplainable in their world. Every natural process had a daemon (spirit), creature, god or goddess to handle the everyday processes that made the world work, from the big stuff (the sun and weather) to the little things (think flowers). And while certain things were handled by the “heavies” of Greek mythology, such as Poseidon, the god of the seas, handling…well, the seas, even he couldn’t be everywhere at once to handle everything wet in the world! He needed a little assistance on that front, especially in places that were far off from his watery domain. Take for instance the rivers. Small and insignificant in the eyes of Poseidon, and so that’s where there was a B-list string of minor gods that handled all of the rivers of the world called the POTAMOI.
    The Potamoi were the deities who handled and took care of various rivers and streams all across the planet (or at least as far as the Greeks knew about!). Minor characters in the grand scheme of things, sure, but all in all, rivers are pretty dang important when it comes to human survival, so some definite credit is due! Kids of the mighty and ancient Titan (a god “before” the gods) Oceanus, or the salty “world-encircling ocean,” and Tethys, the Titaness of fresh waters, the Potamoi were also brothers to the Oceanids, the goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and later on had daughters who were the Naiades, nymphs of the springs and mountains. These guys did a lot of moving and shaking, even if they weren’t main cast members of the Olympian story!
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