ALGEA
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The ALGEA: Sisters of Tears and Sorrow...
Sadness. Every human alive or who has ever been alive knows the dim shadows, shallow tides and deep chasms of sadness. Grief over the loss of a loved one. Sorrow over someone dear to you missed. Distressed over the complexities that life can bring. An assorted array of things that bring pain and tears in a variety of different ways. Sadness. The ancient Greeks, like we do, knew sadness as a close companion; their lives were just as involved and full of ups and downs as we modern folk. Who can really say where sadness comes from? No scientist today can pinpoint it, but the Greeks had no need of science to explain life's darker moments. They planted the blame squarely on the shoulders of the ALGEA, the daimons (spirits or mini-goddesses) of pain, suffering, sorrow and distress.


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Sadness...
The ALGEA were three listless and sour spirits that many hoped to avoid if life would allow it, because they were known as the "bringers of tears and weeping, and because they were the architects of all things painful in life. The Daughters of Eris, the goddess of chaos and strife, the Algea had plenty of human victims to inflict their special brand of torture on, and feasted on the suffering they created. Perhaps that sounds fairly nasty and almost evil, but remember; in Greek mythology EVERYBODY served a purpose. Sadness and grief was often necessary, a cleansing of sorts, before a person could heal. So to look at the silver lining, the Algea allowed a person to get through the suffering they created so that they could start fresh. Not so bad when you look at it that way! Think about it; most people feel much better after a good heart-wrenching cry...


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Distress...
The sisters were related to another spirit of sadness (more the less painful type a kid might have if they lose a toy) named Oizys and Penthos, the melancholy god of mourning and lamentation (he had funerals covered and was probably following Thanatos, god of death, around earth just waiting for a grieving family to attach to.). Breaking them down, the three sisters were Lupe, the daimon of pain, grief and distress; Ania, the daimon of sorrow and trouble; and Achus, the daimon of ache and anguish. This fun bunch probably never got invites to the big-time parties up on Mount Olympus, but you could never say they didn't do (and STILL do) their jobs with skill and determination; the world has been and is still filled with their handiwork...


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The handiwork of the Algea...
The handiwork of the Algea...